At the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

At the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

At Sudanese Ladies Day, Khartoum

At Sudanese Ladies Day, Khartoum

My student friends

My student friends

Teaching Sudanese students a Texas line dance for International Day

Teaching Sudanese students a Texas line dance for International Day

On top of Roha Mountain, Ethiopia

On top of Roha Mountain, Ethiopia

Teacher friends at Unity High School, Khartoum

Teacher friends at Unity High School, Khartoum

THINGS not on my resume

  • I am a Quaker and thus value integrity, honesty, and speaking truth to power.
  • In 2013 I took my family to Khartoum, Sudan, for two years. 
  • I am quick, smart, and witty.
  • The teachers I work with say I'm down to earth, a good listener, and easy to talk to.
  • I have two interesting, beautiful, and fun children.
  • My core values are kindness, courage, and loyalty.
  • I really enjoy working with my students, and they say I'm nice, generous, and supportive.
  • I love to travel.
  • I like pink. 
  • Favorite quote: “If you want to build a ship, don't drum up people together to collect wood and don't assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery 

 

Philosophy of Education

When we “light the fire” as opposed to “fill the pail” as Yeats says, then students will be genuinely engaged and motivated. Beyond those generalizations, I have some specific ideas about what an educated citizen should be able to know, do, and value; habits of head, hand, and heart. 
These three tenets are the foundation of my educational practice:
  • Students should learn to be responsible and active global citizens. 
  • Students should develop highly effective performance habits. 
  • Most importantly, learning should include sustainable moral values.
Students that exemplify these beliefs learn to apply knowledge and persevere in solving complex problems. Thus, educators should plan learning around the question: How can we develop students’ complex reasoning to solve problems both within and across disciplines? The best schools supply a variety of opportunities for students to apply their learning in this way. Doing so requires the higher level cognitive tasks of connecting ideas and concepts. 
Beginning in early childhood, I envision students synthesizing information from multiple sources, exploring alternate perspectives, and illustrating how concepts can be found across time and place. Little children through young adults can use these skills to do the daily work of learning; connecting ideas to texts, making predictions supported by evidence, developing evidence-based arguments, or planning and developing informed solutions to problems that vary in complexity according to level.
To summarize, multi-faceted tasks that incorporate moral and performance values and that connect the students’ classroom experience to the challenging world outside—these are the essential ingredients in a quality education that succeeds in developing responsible global citizens.